Food & Beverage

  • June 12, 2024

    Ex-Wendy's Worker Drops Suit Over Breast-Pumping Space

    A former Wendy's employee who accused the company and multiple related entities of failing to provide proper private space for workers to pump breast milk despite federal labor laws requiring them to do so has permanently dropped her claims from Ohio federal court.

  • June 12, 2024

    Magistrate Endorses Axing OT Suit But Allowing 2nd Chance

    A federal magistrate judge advised tossing an unpaid overtime lawsuit against a California cold storage company that specializes in packing agricultural goods, but said the worker should have an opportunity to flesh out their claims.

  • June 11, 2024

    NFL Sunday Ticket Monopoly Cost Fans $7B, Expert Testifies

    An economist testifying as an expert for the plaintiffs in a California federal trial over multibillion-dollar antitrust claims brought against the NFL by DirecTV Sunday Ticket subscribers said Tuesday that subscribers suffered over $7 billion in damages from DirecTV's alleged monopoly on the television package.

  • June 11, 2024

    Attys For Restaurant Software Investors Ring Up $2.25M Fee

    Attorneys representing investors in a suit against restaurant software company Olo Inc. will receive $2.25 million for brokering settlement of class action claims alleging the company touted an ill-fated partnership with sandwich chain Subway as an example of its success.

  • June 11, 2024

    DOL's H-2A Protections Rule Flouts Labor Law, GOP AGs Say

    The U.S. Department of Labor's final rule including protections for foreign farmworkers within the H-2A visa program doesn't comport with federal labor law, a group of Republican attorneys general claimed in Georgia federal court, saying the rule doesn't give the same rights to U.S. citizen workers.

  • June 11, 2024

    Granulated Sugar Price-Fixing Cases Centralized In Minn.

    A collection of price-fixing suits against some of the country's biggest refined sugar manufacturers is being consolidated in Minnesota federal court, with the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation choosing the venue over federal courts in New York.

  • June 11, 2024

    Skechers Supplier Banned For Alleged Forced Labor Ties

    Federal authorities announced on Tuesday three new additions — including a shoemaker linked to the sneaker brand Skechers — to their blacklist of companies purportedly linked to systematic oppression of Uyghurs and other minority groups in China.

  • June 11, 2024

    Restaurant Owner Seeks $414K For Deductible Overpayment

    The owner of two Florida restaurants is seeking reimbursement of over $400,000, telling a federal district court Tuesday that it overpaid a claim deductible for damage stemming from Hurricane Ian after its insurer misapplied the appropriate endorsement.

  • June 11, 2024

    Charity Founder Charged With Embezzling $2.5M, Evading Tax

    The founder of a New York City charity embezzled $2.5 million in donations meant for low-income families and then failed to report the earnings to the Internal Revenue Service or pay tax on them, according to a criminal complaint unsealed Tuesday in New York federal court.

  • June 11, 2024

    Pepsi Bottling Partner Hit With Pollutant Lawsuit In Mass.

    A Massachusetts environmental advocacy group has followed through on plans to sue a bottler of Pepsi products over alleged violations of the Clean Water Act, but a lawyer for the Conservation Law Foundation says the organization is "optimistic" it will be able to resolve the issue.

  • June 11, 2024

    FDA Urges 11th Circ. To Back E-Cig Ban Over High Nicotine

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is urging the Eleventh Circuit to not let Bidi Vapor market an e-cigarette product that the agency claimed would expose users to nearly twice as much nicotine as a typical combustible cigarette.

  • June 10, 2024

    Pork Producers Look To Put A Fork In Price-Fixing Claims

    Pork producers accused of colluding to diminish supply and inflate prices in sprawling multidistrict litigation have urged a Minnesota federal court to toss all remaining buyers' claims against them, saying statistical reports they use are lawful and their accusers' complaints are untimely.

  • June 10, 2024

    Fox Views NFL Sunday Ticket As 'Existential' Threat, Jury Told

    A retired executive with Fox Sports testified Monday in a trial over multibillion-dollar antitrust claims brought against the NFL by Sunday Ticket subscribers that his network asked the league to agree to specific Sunday Ticket pricing because it viewed the DirecTV television package as an "existential" threat.

  • June 10, 2024

    Coca-Cola Beats False Ad Claims Of PFAS In Juice, For Now

    Coca-Cola defeated, for now, a proposed false advertising class action alleging its line of Simply Tropical fruit juice contains "forever chemicals," when a New York federal judge said Monday the customer lacks standing because his complaint relies on a single allegation of testing without linking the test result to his purchase.

  • June 10, 2024

    Sen. Cassidy Releases Trade Facilitation Framework

    Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., released a policy document Monday outlining priority areas for a forthcoming bill to update U.S. customs law, emphasizing streamlined procedures and technology updates to speed up processing at the border.

  • June 10, 2024

    Fat Brands Faces Investor Suit Over $47M Loan Scheme

    Fat Brands and its executives face a proposed class action in California federal court alleging that they falsely claimed to be cooperating with governmental probes into their CEO's spending $47 million on company loans while skirting taxes, leading stock prices to plunge last month when criminal charges were announced.

  • June 10, 2024

    Fishermen Challenge Feds' Gulf Of Mexico Fishing Quotas

    The owners of a family fishing business are fighting the National Marine Fisheries Service's 80% cut to fishing quotas for gag grouper fish in the Gulf of Mexico, claiming the agency doesn't have the ability to lawfully approve the new rule.

  • June 10, 2024

    Unclaimed Property Group Backs Disney At Mich. High Court

    An unclaimed property holder trade organization urged the Michigan Supreme Court to affirm that the state waited too long to demand that Disney and a restaurant company remit unclaimed property, arguing that third-party auditors' lax oversight allowed examinations to languish beyond the statute of limitations.

  • June 10, 2024

    Ex-Sports Illustrated Publisher Countersues Owner In TM Row

    The former publisher of Sports Illustrated has filed a countersuit alleging that the magazine's owner, Authentic Brands Group, made it impossible to run the magazine and then conspired to install a competitor as the new publisher.

  • June 10, 2024

    Victims Of Chiquita-Funded Paramilitaries Win $38M Award

    The first bellwether trial in multidistrict litigation against Chiquita over its funding of right-wing paramilitaries in Colombia's banana-producing region ended with a victory Monday afternoon for nearly all the plaintiffs, as a Florida federal jury awarded them $38.3 million in damages for the losses of their loved ones killed by paramilitaries.

  • June 10, 2024

    Justices Skip Kroger's TM Feud With Grubhub Over Logo

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review a Seventh Circuit finding that Grubhub Inc.'s fork-and-knife logo does not infringe a similar emblem used by Kroger's meal-kit delivery service Home Chef.

  • June 07, 2024

    NFL's Kraft Testifies 'Too Many' Sunday Ticket Sales Is Bad

    A California federal jury considering multi-billion dollar antitrust claims against the NFL brought by Sunday Ticket subscribers saw video deposition testimony Friday from New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, who said ensuring a high price for the television package is a league priority, and he would not want "too many" U.S. subscribers.

  • June 07, 2024

    Ill. Panel Revives Contribution Claim Over Tainted Cilantro

    An Illinois state appellate panel has revived a bid by a distributor of contaminated cilantro to have wholesalers contribute to any liability in litigation over the tainted product, saying the distributor did not have to comply with pre-suit notice requirements that would otherwise have applied to the case.

  • June 07, 2024

    Texas Farmers Sue EPA For 'Forever Chemical' Contamination

    Five Texas farmers have told a D.C. federal court that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency should have done more to stop "forever chemicals" from contaminating their farmland, claiming that they've suffered medical problems from the exposure.

  • June 07, 2024

    First Trial Over Chiquita Paramilitary Payments Goes To Jury

    A Florida federal jury on Friday began deliberating whether Chiquita is liable for several deaths at the hands of right-wing paramilitary organization Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia although deliberations paused in the afternoon and are scheduled to resume on Monday.

Expert Analysis

  • Litigation Inspiration: Attys Can Be Heroic Like Olympians

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    Although litigation won’t earn anyone an Olympic medal in Paris this summer, it can be worthy of the same lasting honor if attorneys exercise focused restraint — seeking both their clients’ interests and those of the court — instead of merely pursuing every advantage short of sanctionable conduct, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • Lean Into The 'Great Restoration' To Retain Legal Talent

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    As the “great resignation,” in which employees voluntarily left their jobs in droves, has largely dissipated, legal employers should now work toward the idea of a “great restoration,” adopting strategies to effectively hire, onboard and retain top legal talent, says Molly McGrath at Hiring & Empowering Solutions.

  • Momofuku Chili War May Chill Common Phrase TM Apps

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    Momofuku’s recent trademark battle over the “Chili Crunch” mark shows that over-enforcement when protecting exclusivity rights may backfire not just in the public eye, but with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office as well, says Anthony Panebianco at Davis Malm.

  • What The NYSE Proposed Delisting Rule Could Mean For Cos.

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    The New York Stock Exchange's recently proposed rule would provide the exchange with discretionary authority to commence delisting proceedings for a company substantially shifting its primary business focus, raising concerns for NYSE-listed companies over the exact definition of the exchange's proposed "substantially different" standard, say attorneys at Winston & Strawn.

  • Trademark In Artistic Works 1 Year After Jack Daniel's

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    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court's Jack Daniel's v. VIP Products ruling, courts have applied Jack Daniel's inconsistently to deny First Amendment protection to artistic works, providing guidance for dismissing trademark claims relating to film and TV titles, say Hardy Ehlers and Neema Sahni at Covington.

  • Series

    Fishing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Atop the list of ways fishing makes me a better lawyer is the relief it offers from the chronic stress of a demanding caseload, but it has also improved my listening skills and patience, and has served as an exceptional setting for building earnest relationships, says Steven DeGeorge​​​​​​​ at Robinson Bradshaw.

  • A Healthier Legal Industry Starts With Emotional Intelligence

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    The legal profession has long been plagued by high rates of mental health issues, in part due to attorneys’ early training and broader societal stereotypes — but developing one’s emotional intelligence is one way to foster positive change, collectively and individually, says attorney Esperanza Franco.

  • Calif. Web Tracking Cases Show Courts' Indecision Over CIPA

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    Several hundred cases filed to date, and two recent conflicting rulings, underscore California courts' uncertainty over whether the use of web analytics tools to track users' website interactions can give rise to a violation of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, says Patricia Brum at Snell & Wilmer.

  • To Make Your Legal Writing Clear, Emulate A Master Chef

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    To deliver clear and effective written advocacy, lawyers should follow the model of a fine dining chef — seasoning a foundation of pure facts with punchy descriptors, spicing it up with analogies, refining the recipe and trimming the fat — thus catering to a sophisticated audience of decision-makers, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Circuit Judge Writes An Opinion, AI Helps: What Now?

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    Last week's Eleventh Circuit opinion in Snell v. United Specialty Insurance, notable for a concurrence outlining the use of artificial intelligence to evaluate a term's common meaning, is hopefully the first step toward developing a coherent basis for the judiciary's generative AI use, says David Zaslowsky at Baker McKenzie.

  • 'Food As Health' Serves Up Fresh Legal Considerations

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    The growth of food as medicine presents a significant opportunity for healthcare organizations and nontraditional healthcare players to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs, though these innovative programs also bring compliance considerations that must be carefully navigated, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • After Years Of Popularity, PAGA's Fate Is Up In The Air

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    The last two years held important victories for plaintiff-side employment attorneys in California Private Attorneys General Act litigation at the trial and appellate court levels, but this hotbed of activity will quickly lose steam if voters approve a ballot measure in November to enact the California Fair Pay and Employer Accountability Act, says Paul Sherman at Kabat Chapman.

  • Perspectives

    Trauma-Informed Legal Approaches For Pro Bono Attorneys

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    As National Trauma Awareness Month ends, pro bono attorneys should nevertheless continue to acknowledge the mental and physical effects of trauma, allowing them to better represent clients, and protect themselves from compassion fatigue and burnout, say Katherine Cronin at Stinson and Katharine Manning at Blackbird.

  • Series

    Playing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My deep and passionate involvement in playing, writing and producing music equipped me with skills — like creativity, improvisation and problem-solving — that contribute to the success of my legal career, says attorney Kenneth Greene.

  • Proposed Cannabis Reschedule Sidesteps State Law Effects

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent proposal to move cannabis to Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act provides certain benefits, but its failure to address how the rescheduling would interact with existing state cannabis laws disappointed industry participants hoping for clarity on this crucial question, says Ian Stewart at Wilson Elser.

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