Employment

  • May 24, 2024

    CBS Says 1st Amendment Dooms White Writer's Bias Suit

    CBS said a California federal judge should toss a straight white male worker's bias suit claiming he was passed over for writer roles in favor of more diverse candidates, arguing that the First Amendment allows it to tap writers based on their identity as a storytelling operation.

  • May 24, 2024

    Medical Courier Service Settles Drivers' Overtime Suit

    A Georgia-based medical courier service accused of failing to pay its drivers their proper overtime wages has agreed to settle the case, according to an unopposed bid for settlement approval that calls the deal "approximately equal to plaintiffs' best possible day at trial."

  • May 23, 2024

    DLA Piper Must Share Prior Pregnancy Bias Claims With Court

    A New York federal magistrate judge on Wednesday ordered DLA Piper to let her privately review previous pregnancy discrimination complaints against it as part of discovery in a former attorney's suit, an order that comes after the firm argued the burden of sharing them "far outweighs its likely benefit."

  • May 23, 2024

    House Money: The Path To A Landmark NCAA NIL Settlement

    The NCAA is expected to pay more than $2.7 billion to settle a yearslong antitrust class action lawsuit featuring hundreds of thousands of former college athletes who alleged the organization owed them for years of unpaid name, image and likeness compensation. Here, Law360 walks you down the winding path that led to the massive reported settlement.

  • May 23, 2024

    PNC, Loan Officers Ink $12M Deal In Rest Break Suit

    PNC Bank has agreed to pay nearly $12 million to end a class action alleging the bank didn't pay mortgage loan officers for time spent on breaks and failed to issue accurate wage statements, according to a joint motion filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    NCAA, Athletes Settle NIL Class Action Over Billions In Pay

    The NCAA said Thursday it has reached a settlement with the former college athletes who had filed an antitrust class action demanding billions in potential compensation allegedly denied to them for decades before the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the NCAA's compensation ban.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. Marketing Co., Competitor Settle Exec Poaching Suit

    The Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC has reached a settlement with a competitor it accused of poaching a top executive, weeks after bringing a trade secrets lawsuit in federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    TRO Against Ex-TD Bank Employees Revised

    A federal judge in Connecticut walked back part of a temporary restraining order against ex-TD Bank employees accused of siphoning $25 million in business to Raymond James Financial, saying the previous order may have been more restrictive than necessary.

  • May 23, 2024

    FirstKey Sanctioned For Trying To Coerce Workers In OT Suit

    A Texas federal judge sanctioned FirstKey Homes LLC for issuing coercive communications to employees in an apparent effort to steer them from joining a proposed wage and hour class action, finding Wednesday the only purpose the company had was "attempting to undermine the collective action in this case."

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Lockheed Urges 11th Circ. To Affirm Win In Solvent Suit

    Lockheed Martin Corp. asked the Eleventh Circuit on Wednesday to uphold a Florida district court's rejection of a proposed expert's testimony purporting to link a now-deceased former employee's multiple sclerosis to her work-related exposure to industrial solvents.

  • May 23, 2024

    Wash. Atty Stops Practicing Law After Assaulting Associate

    A family law attorney in Washington state has resigned from practicing law after a series of criminal offenses, including a misdemeanor sexual assault and an attempted hate crime involving a colleague after a work-sponsored event, according to state bar association disciplinary records made public this week.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. To Expand Paid Sick Leave To Smaller Businesses

    More employees in Connecticut will soon become eligible for paid sick leave after the state's governor gave his blessing on a bill that expands the state's time-off requirements to include smaller businesses.

  • May 23, 2024

    LA Jury Awards $58M To Train Yard Worker Injured In Slip

    A train yard worker was awarded over $58 million this week by a Los Angeles jury due to an injury that he says occurred when he slipped on top of a wet train car, which resulted in a fractured foot and a diagnosis of complex regional pain syndrome. 

  • May 23, 2024

    Biden Renominates NLRB Chair, Taps Republican For Vacancy

    President Joe Biden on Thursday announced he intends to renominate Lauren McFerran to continue serving as chair of the National Labor Relations Board, while also tapping a Seyfarth Shaw LLP partner to fill a long-vacant Republican seat on the board.

  • May 23, 2024

    Legal Marketer, Ark. Firm Agree To End Trade Secrets Suit

    A legal marketing business has agreed to dismiss a Georgia federal lawsuit accusing an Arkansas law firm and others of stealing and profiting off its trade secrets, including a database of client leads for mass torts over talcum powder and heartburn medication.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    NCAA Can't Move Colo. Athlete Pay Case

    A Colorado federal judge on Thursday rejected a bid by the National Collegiate Athletic Association and collegiate athletic conferences to move athletes' compensation allegations to California, where two similar cases are being heard, highlighting the choice by named plaintiffs to have their claims heard in Colorado.

  • May 23, 2024

    Alaska Airlines, Union Beat Fired Workers' Religious Bias Suit

    A Washington federal judge tossed a suit from two Christian flight attendants who said they were illegally fired by Alaska Airlines and abandoned by their labor union for opposing the airline's support for LGBTQ+ rights, ruling there's no proof unlawful bias cost them their jobs.

  • May 23, 2024

    NYC Mayor And Assault Accuser Spar Over Discovery 'Theatrics'

    The first conference in a lawsuit alleging New York City Mayor Eric Adams sexually assaulted a Police Department colleague in 1991 grew heated Thursday, as attorneys on both sides accused the others of improper discovery gambits.

  • May 23, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Questions Role In Wage Suit After Ch. 11

    Jackson Lewis PC attorneys were unsure if they were able to keep representing more than a dozen Pennsylvania nursing homes as an unpaid-wage case approaches a critical deadline, telling a federal court during a conference Thursday that the Bankruptcy Code suspended their service to a group of defendants who filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy earlier in May.

  • May 23, 2024

    Ambulance Co. Owner Accused Of $1M Pandemic Loan Fraud

    The owner of a California ambulance company who was charged last year with tax evasion and filing false returns has been further accused of fraudulently securing $1 million from federal pandemic relief loan programs, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Reinforces Calif. Labor And Employment Team

    Fisher Phillips has hired two of counsel in its Irvine, California, office to continue representing employers and helping those clients navigate a range of labor and employment matters.

  • May 23, 2024

    Philly-Area Home Health Co.'s OT Settlement Gets First Nod

    A Pennsylvania federal judge gave an early nod to a deal resolving a proposed class of nurses' overtime suit against a Philadelphia nursing home that allegedly failed to pay its in-home care workers the proper rates for overtime in violation of both state and federal wage laws.

  • May 23, 2024

    Wow Such Basic: Justices Back Crypto Fans In Dogecoin Duel

    It's up to judges, not arbitrators, to figure out whether contracts between businesses and consumers have subtly superseded earlier agreements to hash out disputes in arbitration rather than litigation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Thursday.

Expert Analysis

  • How FTC's Noncompete Rule May Affect Exec Comp Packages

    Author Photo

    In the event the Federal Trade Commission's final noncompete rule goes into effect as currently contemplated, companies will need to take stock of how they structure post-employment executive compensation arrangements, such as severance agreements and clawbacks, says Meredith O'Leary at King & Spalding.

  • 8 Legal Issues Influencing Investors In The Creator Economy

    Author Photo

    The rapidly expanding digital creator economy — funding for which more than doubled in the U.S. in the first quarter — comes with its own set of unique legal issues investors must carefully consider before diving in, say Louis Lehot and Alan Pate at Foley & Lardner.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

    Author Photo

    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • What CRA Deadline Means For Biden Admin. Rulemaking

    Author Photo

    With the 2024 election rapidly approaching, the Biden administration must race to finalize proposed agency actions within the next few weeks, or be exposed to the chance that the following Congress will overturn the rules under the Congressional Review Act, say attorneys at Covington.

  • Rebuttal

    Time For Congress To Let Qualified Older Pilots Keep Flying

    Author Photo

    While a previous Law360 guest article affirmed the current law requiring airline pilots to retire at age 65, the facts suggest that the pilots, their unions, the airlines and the flying public will all benefit if Congress allows experienced, medically qualified aviators to stay in the cockpit, say Allen Baker and Bo Ellis at Let Experienced Pilots Fly.

  • What's Notable In JAMS' New Mass Arbitration Rules

    Author Photo

    The Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services’ recently released guidelines, coming on the heels of similar American Arbitration Association amendments, suggests that mass arbitrations will remain an efficient means for consumers to vindicate their rights against companies, say Jonathan Waisnor and Brandon Heitmann at Labaton Keller. 

  • Fostering Employee Retention Amid Shaky DEI Landscape

    Author Photo

    Ongoing challenges to the legality of corporate diversity, equity and inclusion programs are complicating efforts to use DEI as an employee retention tool, but with the right strategic approach employers can continue to recruit and retain diverse talent — even after the FTC’s ban on noncompetes, says Ally Coll at the Purple Method.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

    Author Photo

    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

  • FTC Noncompete Rule May Still Face Historical Hurdles

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's final rule banning noncompetes might face challenges that could have been avoided with more cautious consideration of the commission's long history of failed lawsuits that went beyond the agency's statutory authority, as well as the mountain of judicial precedent justifying noncompete agreements in employment contracts, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • Justices' Title VII Ruling Requires Greater Employer Vigilance

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Muldrow v. St. Louis ruling expands the types of employment decisions that can be challenged under Title VII, so employers will need to carefully review decisions that affect a term, condition or privilege of employment, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Game-Changing Decisions Call For New Rules At The NCAA

    Author Photo

    From a newly formed college players union to coaches transferring at the drop of a hat, the National College Athletic Association needs an overhaul, including federal supervision, says Frank Darras at DarrasLaw.

  • What Makes Unionization In Financial Services Unique

    Author Photo

    Only around 1% of financial services employees are part of a union, but that number is on the rise, presenting both unique opportunities and challenges for the employers and employees that make up a sector typically devoid of union activity, say Amanda Fugazy and Steven Nevolis at Ellenoff Grossman.

  • A Guide To Using The DTSA For Misappropriation Recourse

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    Nicholas Armington at Mintz explains the ins and outs of drafting a misappropriation complaint under the Defend Trade Secrets Act, and how and why companies should think strategically about federal and state law when filing a claim.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!